The increase in the number of people diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus or HIV creates alarm among the medical community and the entire world. In fact, countries around the world conduct HIV awareness and treatment campaigns in order to help those infected with this virus. HIV is a lentivirus that causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or AIDS and HIV infection.

Because of the increased number of people with HIV, more hematologists are trying their best to develop an effective HIV vaccine. One of these dedicated hematologists is Jean-Marie Andrieu who is in the process of developing an interesting drinkable product. What could possibly be different about this vaccine? He uses probiotics as some of the primary ingredients!

HIV and the Drinkable Vaccine!

Red Blood Cells_HIV_ProbioticsBasically, HIV can be found in body fluids such as breast milk, blood, vaginal fluids and semen of a person infected by the virus. The virus is transferable from an infected person to another, through sexual contact and blood-to-blood contact. Aside from sexual and blood contact, women with HIV can also pass HIV to babies through breast feeding. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services states that there are over 35 million people worldwide who are living with HIV/AIDS, and 3.2 million of them are under the age of 15. Because of this, there is a high demand for an effective vaccine.

Jean-Marie Andrieu is the medical professor from Paris-Descartes University who decided to take on the challenge of creating a healthy and drinkable HIV vaccine. In theory this could help people to ward of infection when exposed to a high concentration of the virus. Andrieu’s unique approach is his use of the probiotic ingredients Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Probiotics are know for their ability to strengthen immunity, aid in gastrointestinal health and contribute to the overall mental health when taken regularly.

Andrieu effectively used the vaccine on monkey test subjects to ward off SIV (the monkey version of HIV) for 4 years. He published his findings in the journal, Frontiers in Immunology. He is optimistic that the HIV vaccine will be effective in terms of protecting people against the HIV virus, and he plans on starting voluntary human trials this year.

This is a huge step forward in HIV research and virus prevention. Scientists are just scratching the surface of the human body’s ability to ward off disease with increased immune functions. We are fortunate to have doctors like Jean-Marie Andrieu who are willing to think outside-the-box and discover vaccines that could save millions of lives for years to come.