L. fermentum – A common probiotic strain

by | Aug 29, 2017 | Blog, Probiotic Education, Product Information

L. fermentumLactobacillus fermentum (L. fermentum) is a probiotic bacterium that is located naturally in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and vaginal tract in humans. It is more survivable in acid and bile than other probiotic strains.1 L. fermentum offers a number of potential benefits, including reducing cholesterol and boosting immunity. It is also one of the few strains particularly beneficial for dealing with issues more prevalent in women, like yeast infections and UTIs. Read on to learn more about why L. fermentum is a probiotic worth considering.

L. fermentum could help to control obesity

L. fermentum may assist in reducing the development of obesity by modifying the way energy is handled within the host.2 This suggests potential to create a microbiome that favors fat oxidation (breakdown) over fat storage by populating the gut with protective bacteria and preventing the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria. An important note from this study is that while all groups lost significant amounts of body fat, there was a trend toward more fat loss when probiotics were happily colonizing the intestine. The difference was about two to three pounds lost with the probiotics compared to only one pound lost with the plain yogurt.

L. fermentum offers specific benefits for women

L. fermentum may inhibit the growth of Candida albicans and demonstrates the capability to prevent yeast infections.3 Other studies have shown that L. fermentum could be effective in helping to reduce the likelihood of UTI recurrences in women.4

L. fermentum helps with cholesterol

According to this study, L. fermentum has the ability to reduce cholesterol levels.5

L. fermentum modulates immunity

L. fermentum exhibits some antimicrobial and antioxidative properties. It has demonstrated the ability to suppress growth of harmful bacteria, like staphylococci, toxic enterobacteria, and common hospital-acquired infections like S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.6,7 Recent studies also suggest that it could improve resistance against influenza infections.8 According to one study, L. fermentum could be helpful in maintaining remission and preventing relapse of ulcerative colitis.9 It could also reduce the duration or severity of some infections like respiratory illness.10

L. fermentum may be able to help ease some of the negative effects of the aging process, particularly immunosenescence, which is the muliti-faceted decline in the function of the immune system that occurs during progressive aging.11 According to the test results, L. fermentum helps to resist infections and improve anti-oxidant capacity, which signify its potential in supporting healthy aging.

As with most probiotics, research is ongoing for L. fermentum, but it is clear that there are already a wide variety of proven benefits to supplementation. You want to provide your gut with a variety of beneficial bacteria to build and maintain a healthy microbiota. L. fermentum is a great candidate for that probiotic cocktail. Keep that in mind next time you’re shopping for a probiotic.


1Pan, D. D., Zeng, X. Q., & Yan, Y. T. (2011). Characterisation of Lactobacillus fermentum SM-7 isolated from koumiss, a potential probiotic bacterium with cholesterol-lowering effects. Journal of the science of food and agriculture, 91(3), 512–518. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4214
2Sanchez, M., Panahi, S., & Tremblay, A. (2014). Childhood obesity: a role for gut microbiota?. International journal of environmental research and public health, 12(1), 162–175. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph120100162
3Cadieux, Peter & Burton, Jeremy & Gardiner, Gillian & Braunstein, Ivo & Bruce, Andrew & Kang, Chil-Yong & Reid, Gregor. (2002). Lactobacillus Strains and Vaginal Ecology. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association. 287. 1940-1. 10.1001/jama.287.15.1935
4Falagas, M. E., Betsi, G. I., Tokas, T., & Athanasiou, S. (2006). Probiotics for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women: a review of the evidence from microbiological and clinical studies. Drugs, 66(9), 1253–1261. https://doi.org/10.2165/00003495-200666090-00007
5Pan, D. D., Zeng, X. Q., & Yan, Y. T. (2011). Characterisation of Lactobacillus fermentum SM-7 isolated from koumiss, a potential probiotic bacterium with cholesterol-lowering effects. Journal of the science of food and agriculture, 91(3), 512–518. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4214
6Rybalchenko, O. V., Bondarenko, V. M., Orlova, O. G., Markov, A. G., & Amasheh, S. (2015). Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus fermentum on microbial growth and biofilm formation. Archives of microbiology, 197(8), 1027–1032. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00203-015-1140-1
7Varma, P., Nisha, N., Dinesh, K. R., Kumar, A. V., & Biswas, R. (2011). Anti-infective properties of Lactobacillus fermentum against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Journal of molecular microbiology and biotechnology, 20(3), 137–143. https://doi.org/10.1159/000328512
8Olivares, M., Díaz-Ropero, M. P., Sierra, S., Lara-Villoslada, F., Fonollá, J., Navas, M., Rodríguez, J. M., & Xaus, J. (2007). Oral intake of Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 enhances the effects of influenza vaccination. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(3), 254–260. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2007.01.004
9Hegazy, S. K., & El-Bedewy, M. M. (2010). Effect of probiotics on pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-kappaB activation in ulcerative colitis. World journal of gastroenterology, 16(33), 4145–4151. https://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v16.i33.4145
10Cox, A. J., Pyne, D. B., Saunders, P. U., & Fricker, P. A. (2010). Oral administration of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum VRI-003 and mucosal immunity in endurance athletes. British journal of sports medicine, 44(4), 222–226. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2007.044628
11Cox, A. J., Pyne, D. B., Saunders, P. U., & Fricker, P. A. (2010). Oral administration of the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum VRI-003 and mucosal immunity in endurance athletes. British journal of sports medicine, 44(4), 222–226. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2007.044628

 

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About the Author

Ryan Bentley, MD, PhD, DC

Co-Founder, Medical Director | Dr. Ryan Bentley is a physician, researcher, author, educator and national speaker. He has a passion for health and helping people live their best possible lives. Dr. Bentley and the doctors Humarian uniquely formulated the Probonix line of probiotics to address the needs of their patients and those suffering from a variety of health conditions.

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